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Ashwagandha, the 21st century plant with multiple properties

Posted by Jean Baptiste on

Ashwagandha, the 21st century plant with multiple properties

Ashwagandha is a plant native to India. It is commonly called "Indian ginseng" (scientific name "Withania somnifera") and has been used in traditional use in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries. Ashwagandha contains a cocktail of unusual compounds: (1) flavonoids, which are very powerful natural antioxidants, (2) phenolic acids, (3) fatty acids, (4) alkaloids, (5) catechin, (5) steroidal lactones, (6) kaempferol. It is this unique composition that makes Ashwagandha one of the most powerful plants in the world!

Stimium Ashwagandha is thus positioned (1) as an extremely beneficial health product, but also (2) as a very interesting solution for athletes.

With a concentration of withanolides and sitoindosides, very specific antioxidant enzymes, Ashwagandha (the root of the plant often presented in powder form) helps reduce the effects of oxidative stress on our brain, while improving cognitive abilities. Ashwagandha is an “adaptogenic” plant, just like rhodiola rosea which is found in Stimium Pro Nrj caps , Asian ginseng which is found in Stimium KG , Bacopa , or even Gingko Biloba .

Furthermore, by acting on stress, on the central nervous system and on our well-being, Stimium Ashwagandha also contributes to improving our sleep and rest. It is entirely possible to consume ashwagandha to combat sleep disorders, and in particular against insomnia. Thanks to its somniferine and L-tryptophan content, ashwagandha can act on your sleep. Better still, it will help you fall asleep and prevent you from waking up unexpectedly at night.

Ashwagandha is also an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant herb. Indeed, Stimium Ashwagandha helps prevent and fight against joint diseases, such as rheumatism or arthritis.

But that's not all ! Stimium Ashwagandha is also known for its extraordinary antioxidant properties. By improving the elimination of free radicals in the body, it helps counter cellular aging. This Ayurvedic product is also involved in maintaining optimal cognitive activity because of its ability to keep neurons active for longer.

For sports practice, considering that Ashwagandha is obviously not listed on the WADA lists as a doping product (it is therefore authorized of course), it is quite interesting to take a supplement including this plant. Indeed, Stimium Ashwagandha, like most adaptogenic plants, helps the body adapt to all stressful situations, so it is an excellent remedy to combat anxiety. In this way, Ashwagandha helps improve sports performance and endurance. But not only that, because this plant improves muscle function and optimizes recovery after intense physical effort, a complete effect for the body.

Ashwagandha also helps improve the sporting performance of athletes who mobilize both their explosiveness and their strength, particularly in activities such as fitness or bodybuilding or even explosive sports, such as sprinting (athletics, swimming), combat sports, rugby , handball , basketball , hockey… Ashwagandha supplementation has also been shown to increase testosterone production in people following strength training programs. Several studies have demonstrated that this plant improves strength and helps increase muscle mass in people who strengthen muscles, improve balance, power, maximum velocity, and maximum oxygen consumption in athletes.

Recent Meta Analyzes suggest that Ashwagandha supplementation improves variables related to (1) strength/power, (2) cardiorespiratory fitness, and (3) fatigue/recovery in healthy men and women exercising. physical activity (https://www.mdpi.com/2411-5142/6/1/20/htm).

Stimium Ashwagandha, a food supplement, is also effective in endurance sports, in particular on the maximum capacity for oxygen consumption with an impact on VO2MAX, on the reduction of the effects of fatigue and on cardiovascular endurance (the capacity to continue for a certain time a moderate effort using all the muscles).

Be careful, however, if Ashwagandha has multiple properties, due as we have seen to its rather exceptional composition, this means at the same time that it is necessary to control all of its effects. For example, this plant can cause various intestinal disorders (diarrhea or even constipation) at very high doses. This is why Stimium Ashwagandha is dosed at 300 mg and one capsule per day is recommended. We do not recommend more than 3 capsules per day, because from 900mg per day, this type of side effects could occur, removing all the benefits of regular intake. Always in high doses, ashwagandha can generate a hypnotic effect. The presence of alkaloids in the composition of ashwagandha makes it a plant not recommended for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Furthermore, ashwagandha is often not recommended for people with intestinal disorders, hyperthyroidism or even hemochromatosis. Finally, people who are taking treatment with antidepressants should also seek the advice of their doctor before starting a course of ashwagandha or any other plant.

We did not develop this product with Stimium R&D by chance. We believe in the power of plants, especially after a careful analysis of the bibliography which demonstrates the benefits of this plant in medicine, both for athletes and non-athletes. We hope that like us, you will be convinced by the benefits of Ashwagandha, as part of a physical activity, or in your everyday life, which is always more stressful. We at Stimium are certain that this will be the plant of the coming years, as we can see more and more publications relating to its beneficial effects. We hope we have convinced you!

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